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Table 2 Clini cal Language Status Questionnaire (CLSQ)

From: Corticosteroid therapy in regressive autism: a retrospective study of effects on the Frequency Modulated Auditory Evoked Response (FMAER), language, and behavior

Expressive score Receptive score
10 Appears normal 10 Seems normal
9 Normal but dysarthric 9 Nearly normal receptively
9 Nearly normal expressively 9 Responds to incidental language
9 1–3 word sentence 9 Responds to multiple (>2) part requests
9 Produces meaningful (>2 word) phrases 8 Responds to two part requests
8 Produces meaningful 1–2 word phrases 6 Responds to one part requests
7 Produces single words on own initiative 4 Responds to words without gestures
5 Mimics words strings without meaning 2 Responds to words with gestures
4 Produces meaningless words 1 Responds better to voices than to noises
3 Only sings words 0 Responds better to noises than to voices
1 Produces word-like meaningless sounds 0 Acts deaf
1 Babbles, no words  
0 Makes noises, or only screams  
0 Mute  
  1. Receptive Language Scoring
  2. Ask the parent(s): “In the course of the last month what is the most complex spoken language, given without helpful gestures, that you know your child understands and may respond to but need not respond to every time.”
  3. Ask for discrete examples and match to 11 shown possibilities. We are after the highest level response of which the parents are certain. Parents may be shown the alternative choices but not the associated scores.
  4. Expressive Language Scoring
  5. Ask the parent(s): “In the course of the last month what is the most complex spoken language you have heard your child produce.” Again we are after the highest level of language production of which the parents are certain. Match to one of the 14 shown possibilities. Parents may be given the alternative choices but not the associated scores.